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Angina

Q
What are the warning signs of serious complications?
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Sometimes it is hard to tell the difference between unstable angina and a heart attack. Angina can be a sign of increased risk of stroke. Angina can also trigger sudden cardiac arrest. These are medical emergencies. If you think that you or someone else is having the following symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately. Every minute matters. […] Read More
Q
What lifestyle changes can improve life with angina?
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Angina is a symptom of ischemic heart disease. Your doctor may recommend the following heart-healthy lifestyle changes to help you manage angina: • Heart-healthy eating. Following a healthy eating plan, including limiting alcohol, can prevent or reduce high blood pressure and high blood cholesterol, helping you reduce angina symptoms and maintain a healthy weight. You […] Read More
Q
What does life with angina look like?
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Angina raises your risk of having a heart attack. But it’s treatable. Consider it a warning sign and make healthy choices. Talk with others who have it. That may help you learn how to feel better. Your family, too, may need support to help them understand your angina. They’ll want to know what they can […] Read More
Q
What is the treatment for angina?
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Your doctor will decide on a treatment approach based on the type of angina you have, your symptoms, test results, and risk of complications. Unstable angina is a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment in a hospital. If your angina is stable and your symptoms are not getting worse, you may be able to control […] Read More
Q
What is angina diagnosed?
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Your doctor may diagnose angina based on your medical history, a physical exam, and diagnostic tests and procedures. These tests can help assess whether you need immediate treatment for a heart attack. Some of these tests may help rule out other conditions. • Medical history Your doctor will want to learn about your signs and […] Read More
Q
What are the signs, symptoms, and complications of angina?
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A
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Signs and symptoms vary based on the type of angina you have and on whether you are a man or a woman. Angina symptoms can differ in severity, location in the body, timing, and how much relief you may feel with rest or medicines. Since symptoms of angina and of heart attack can be the […] Read More
Q
What are the screening and prevention of angina?
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Typically, doctors screen for angina only when you have symptoms. However, your doctor may assess your risk factors for ischemic heart disease every few years as part of your regular office visits. If you have two or more risk factors, then your doctor may estimate the chance that you will develop ischemic heart disease, which […] Read More
Q
What are risk factors for angina?
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You may have an increased risk for angina because of your age, environment or occupation, genetics, lifestyle, other medical conditions, race, or sex. • Age Genetic or lifestyle factors can cause plaque to build up in your arteries as you age. This means that your risk for ischemic heart disease and angina increases as you […] Read More
Q
What are the causes of angina?
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by AGE2B
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Angina happens when your heart muscle does not get enough oxygen-rich blood. Medical conditions, particularly ischemic heart disease, or lifestyle habits can cause angina. Angina usually happens because of heart disease. A fatty substance called plaque builds up in your arteries, blocking blood flow to your heart muscle. This forces your heart to work with […] Read More
Q
What are the types of angina?
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• Stable angina. This is the most common. Physical activity or stress can trigger it. It usually lasts a few minutes, and it goes away when you rest. It isn’t a heart attack, but it can be a sign that you’re more likely to have one. Tell your doctor if this happens to you. Stable […] Read More

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