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Arrhythmia

Q
How can arrhythmia be prevented?
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You can’t always prevent arrhythmias. Regular checkups with your doctor can help keep you from having more heart rhythm problems. Be sure they know all the medications you’re taking. Some cold and cough medicines can trigger an arrhythmia, so talk to your doctor before using them. They may also recommend some lifestyle changes: • Eat […] Read More
Q
What are the complications of arrhythmias?
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Without treatment, an uneven heart rhythm could cause dangerous problems such as: • Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. These cognitive disorders may happen because your brain doesn’t get enough blood over time. • Heart failure. Your heart might not pump as well as it should after repeated arrhythmias. • Stroke. Blood that lingers in your atria […] Read More
Q
What are the treatment options for arrhythmia?
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Treatment for arrhythmia is only necessary if the condition is increasing the risk of more severe arrhythmia or a complication, or if the symptoms are severe. The various arrhythmias require different treatments. 1.         Treatments for bradycardia If bradycardia occurs due to an underlying condition, a doctor will need to treat that condition first. If they […] Read More
Q
How is arrhythmia diagnosed?
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To diagnose an arrhythmia or find its cause, doctors use tests including: • EKG. An electrocardiogram records the electrical activity of your heart. You wear small electrode patches on your chest, arms, and legs for the quick, painless test, which you take in your doctor’s office. • Holter monitor. This is a portable EKG (also […] Read More
Q
What types of arrhythmia are there?
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Arrhythmias are divided up by the place where they happen. If they start in the ventricles, or lower chambers of your heart, they’re called ventricular. When they begin in the atria or upper chambers, they’re called supraventricular. Doctors also group them by how they affect your resting heart rate. Bradycardia is a heart rate of […] Read More
Q
What are arrhythmia risk factors?
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• Age. The chances go up as you get older. • Lifestyle. Alcohol, tobacco, and recreational drugs can raise your risk. • Medical conditions. High blood pressure, diabetes, low blood sugar, obesity, sleep apnea, and autoimmune disorders are among the conditions that may cause heart rhythm problems. • Environment. Especially a bad one, like air […] Read More
Q
What are the causes of arrhythmia?
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You could have arrhythmia even if your heart is healthy. Or it could happen because of: • The wrong balance of electrolytes (such as sodium or potassium) in your blood; • Heart injury or changes such as reduced blood flow or stiff heart tissue; • Healing process after heart surgery; • Infection or fever; • […] Read More
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What are the symptoms of arrhythmia?
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An arrhythmia can be silent, meaning you don’t notice any symptoms. Your doctor may spot an uneven heartbeat during a physical exam. If you have symptoms, they may include: • Palpitations (a feeling of skipped heartbeats, fluttering, or “flip-flops”); • Pounding in your chest; • Dizziness or feeling lightheaded; • Fainting; • Shortness of breath; […] Read More
Q
What is arrhythmia?
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An arrhythmia is an irregular heartbeat. It means your heart is out of its usual rhythm. It may feel like your heart skipped a beat, added a beat, or is “fluttering.” It might feel like it’s beating too fast (which doctors call tachycardia) or too slow (called bradycardia). Or you might not notice anything. Arrhythmias […] Read More

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