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Hypoxia

Q
What is the treatment for cerebral hypoxia?
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The most important treatment for cerebral hypoxia involves removing the source of oxygen deprivation. Choking victims may need the Heimlich maneuver or to be intubated. Blood clots might need to be removed, or the patient might need the assistance of a ventilator until the source of the oxygen deprivation can be discovered. Thereafter, there is […] Read More
Q
What are short- and long-term effects of cerebral hypoxia?
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The effects of cerebral hypoxia depend primarily on how long the brain is deprived of oxygen. Short-term diffuse hypoxia often produces no effects at all. For instance, a wrestler who loses consciousness with his opponent’s arm around his neck will likely regain full functioning after he regains consciousness. People who experience this sort of short-term […] Read More
Q
What are the symptoms of cerebral hypoxia?
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Cerebral hypoxia is a medical emergency, and victims often know the cause, particularly if they’ve fallen or suffered another traumatic injury. When cerebral hypoxia is due to a stroke or other internal issue, symptoms can appear more slowly. Some warning signs that your brain has been deprived of oxygen include: ·       Feeling light-headed; ·       Intense […] Read More
Q
What are the types of cerebral hypoxia?
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Doctors classify hypoxia of the brain into four distinct categories, ranging from least to most severe: Diffuse cerebral hypoxia causes mild to moderate impairment in brain function due to low blood oxygen levels. This sort of hypoxia is common among people who hold their breaths for too long, or who participate in sports that involve […] Read More
Q
What is hypoxia?
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Cerebral hypoxia occurs when oxygen supply to the brain is reduced, often as the result of decreased blood flow, but it is not completely eliminated. This differs from cerebral anoxia, which is a complete lack of oxygen supply to the brain. Because the brain relies on oxygen, even just a minute of deprivation can cause […] Read More

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