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Questions and Answers

Q
How long is a transition to menopause?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
The transition to menopause is usually measured in years, rather than months. In general, the symptoms last fewer than 10 years, but you might experience the majority of symptoms over a period of 1 to 3 years. Every woman is different. Some women have symptoms throughout their lives. Others go through menopause and don’t experience […] Read More

The transition to menopause is usually measured in years, rather than months. In general, the symptoms last fewer than 10 years, but you might experience the majority of symptoms over a period of 1 to 3 years.

Every woman is different. Some women have symptoms throughout their lives. Others go through menopause and don’t experience any symptoms at all, they just stop their monthly bleeding. Although, both examples are exceptional cases.

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Q
How can I deal with vaginal dryness?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Try using a plant-based vaginal lubricant, coconut or olive oil, to help make sex more comfortable. You can also try using an over-the-counter vaginal moisturizer like Replens to preserve moisture in your vagina.  If the dryness is severe, the most effective treatment may be vaginal DHEA or estrogen therapy.  Read More

Try using a plant-based vaginal lubricant, coconut or olive oil, to help make sex more comfortable. You can also try using an over-the-counter vaginal moisturizer like Replens to preserve moisture in your vagina. 

If the dryness is severe, the most effective treatment may be vaginal DHEA or estrogen therapy. 

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Q
What can I do to improve mood swings from menopause?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Getting enough sleep and staying physically active may help prevent mood swings. You can also try learning new techniques to deal with stress, like meditating or journaling. If you need somebody to talk to, consider joining a support group or seeing a therapist. Read More

Getting enough sleep and staying physically active may help prevent mood swings. You can also try learning new techniques to deal with stress, like meditating or journaling. If you need somebody to talk to, consider joining a support group or seeing a therapist.

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Q
Can hormone therapy (HT) help treat menopause symptoms?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
For females with a uterus, HT involves the hormones estrogen and progestin. Women who don’t have a uterus anymore use estrogen alone. Most of the estrogen prescribed is bioidentical estradiol and is delivered through the skin. HT can be very effective at relieving moderate to severe menopausal symptoms and preventing hip fractures. However, HT isn’t […] Read More

For females with a uterus, HT involves the hormones estrogen and progestin. Women who don’t have a uterus anymore use estrogen alone.

Most of the estrogen prescribed is bioidentical estradiol and is delivered through the skin. HT can be very effective at relieving moderate to severe menopausal symptoms and preventing hip fractures.

However, HT isn’t for everybody. A doctor will perform an individual risk assessment and counsel you on ways to reduce the risk of blood clots, heart attack, stroke, breast cancer, and gallbladder disease, which can be associated with HT. 

 You should not take HT if you:

 •          Think you are pregnant;

•           Have undiagnosed vaginal bleeding;

•           Have had breast cancer or uterine cancer;

•           Have had a stroke or heart attack;

•           Have had blood clots;

•           Have liver disease or heart disease.

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Q
Sex has become painful since menopause. What can I do?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
The pain you are experiencing during sex can happen due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels during menopause. Talk to your doctor about possible causes of painful intercourse. There are special lubricants you can try to relieve the symptoms. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are also local estrogen treatments […] Read More

The pain you are experiencing during sex can happen due to vaginal dryness associated with declining estrogen levels during menopause. Talk to your doctor about possible causes of painful intercourse. There are special lubricants you can try to relieve the symptoms. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a suggestion. There are also local estrogen treatments - cream, tablets, and an estrogen ring - that treat vaginal dryness. An oral drug taken once a day, Osphena, is also available. The drug makes vaginal tissue thicker and less fragile, resulting in less pain for women during sex.

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Q
Do women have sexual issues after menopause?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Yes, problems with sexual function occur in women of all ages. These include difficulties with sexual interest, arousal, orgasm function, and pain. Read More

Yes, problems with sexual function occur in women of all ages. These include difficulties with sexual interest, arousal, orgasm function, and pain.

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Q
Does menopause increase the risk of heart disease?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Yes. After menopause, women are more likely to have cardiovascular problems, like heart attacks and strokes. Changes in estrogen levels may be part of the cause, but so is getting older. That’s because as you get older, you may gain weight and develop other health conditions that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Ask your […] Read More

Yes. After menopause, women are more likely to have cardiovascular problems, like heart attacks and strokes. Changes in estrogen levels may be part of the cause, but so is getting older.

That’s because as you get older, you may gain weight and develop other health conditions that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Ask your doctor about important tests like those for cholesterol and high blood pressure.

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Q
Does menopause cause bone loss?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Lower estrogen around the time of menopause leads to bone loss in women. Bone loss can cause bones to weaken, which can cause bones to break more easily. When bones weaken a lot, the condition is called osteoporosis. To keep the bones strong, women need weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, climbing stairs, or using weights. […] Read More

Lower estrogen around the time of menopause leads to bone loss in women. Bone loss can cause bones to weaken, which can cause bones to break more easily. When bones weaken a lot, the condition is called osteoporosis. To keep the bones strong, women need weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, climbing stairs, or using weights. You can also protect bone health by eating foods rich in calcium and vitamin D, or if needed, taking calcium and vitamin D supplements. Quitting smoking also helps protect your bones.

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Q
How can I prevent hot flashes?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Avoid triggers, such as:  •          Spicy foods; •           Alcohol; •           Caffeine; •           Stress. Keep a fan at home or in your workplace, and try taking slow and deep breaths when you feel a hot flash starting. Read More

Avoid triggers, such as:

 •          Spicy foods;

•           Alcohol;

•           Caffeine;

•           Stress.

Keep a fan at home or in your workplace, and try taking slow and deep breaths when you feel a hot flash starting.

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Q
Can a hysterectomy cause menopause?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
A woman who had a hysterectomy, but kept her ovaries, does not have menopause right away. Because the uterus is removed, you no longer have periods and cannot get pregnant. However, your ovaries might still make hormones, so you might not have other signs of menopause. Later on, you might have natural menopause a year […] Read More

A woman who had a hysterectomy, but kept her ovaries, does not have menopause right away. Because the uterus is removed, you no longer have periods and cannot get pregnant. However, your ovaries might still make hormones, so you might not have other signs of menopause. Later on, you might have natural menopause a year or two earlier than usually expected.

A woman who has both ovaries removed at the same time when the hysterectomy is done reaches menopause right away. Having both ovaries removed is called a bilateral oophorectomy. Women who have this operation no longer have periods and may have menopausal symptoms right away.

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