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Allergy

Q
I’m allergic to my dog, but I won’t give him up. What can I do?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Avoidance is the best defense against allergies. But if you can’t get away from your allergen, or, more specifically, if you can’t give up your dog, or cat, or gerbil, and your symptoms can’t be helped by over-the-counter medications, see an allergist. For some patients, a custom-made allergy shot can be designed to desensitize you […] Read More

Avoidance is the best defense against allergies. But if you can't get away from your allergen, or, more specifically, if you can't give up your dog, or cat, or gerbil, and your symptoms can't be helped by over-the-counter medications, see an allergist. For some patients, a custom-made allergy shot can be designed to desensitize you to your four-legged allergen friends.

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Q
Can eating local honey or pollen reduce allergy symptoms?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
There is no scientific evidence to support the theory that eating local honey or pollen will cure allergies. Practically speaking, most people’s seasonal allergies are caused by airborne pollen from grass and ragweed, and those aren’t the plants that honey bees are visiting. So it’s unlikely that the pollen you’re allergic to is the pollen […] Read More

There is no scientific evidence to support the theory that eating local honey or pollen will cure allergies. Practically speaking, most people's seasonal allergies are caused by airborne pollen from grass and ragweed, and those aren't the plants that honey bees are visiting. So it's unlikely that the pollen you're allergic to is the pollen you'll find in honey. What's more, some people can have allergic reactions to impurities in some honey. It's fine to eat honey if that's part of your diet, but adding honey as an allergy treatment doesn't have any scientific rationale behind it.

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Q
How much wheezing is OK?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Always consult your doctor when you experience wheezing. Wheezing can be due to allergies or asthma, but sometimes it’s a sign of a heart problem. It’s better to be safe and check in with your physician. Read More

Always consult your doctor when you experience wheezing. Wheezing can be due to allergies or asthma, but sometimes it's a sign of a heart problem. It's better to be safe and check in with your physician.

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Q
Can certain foods give me a runny nose?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Food allergies are not likely to cause a runny nose. They usually cause scratchy, itchy mouth and throat; or you may develop hives, a skin rash, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach cramps, or have difficulty breathing. Some older individuals experience a runny nose when they eat spicy, hot foods. That’s called gustatory rhinitis, and the […] Read More

Food allergies are not likely to cause a runny nose. They usually cause scratchy, itchy mouth and throat; or you may develop hives, a skin rash, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or stomach cramps, or have difficulty breathing. Some older individuals experience a runny nose when they eat spicy, hot foods. That's called gustatory rhinitis, and the quickest cure is to finish eating or order something else.

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Q
Is it safe to take an over-the-counter allergy medication every day?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
You should consult with your physician. There are several types of over-the-counter allergy medications. Antihistamines can cause sedation and performance impairment. Zyrtec (cetirizine), Claritin (loratadine), and Allegra (fexofenadine) may also cause sedation, but if taken at night, this side effect can be minimized. These three antihistamines are safe to take on a daily basis. Over-the-counter […] Read More

You should consult with your physician. There are several types of over-the-counter allergy medications. Antihistamines can cause sedation and performance impairment. Zyrtec (cetirizine), Claritin (loratadine), and Allegra (fexofenadine) may also cause sedation, but if taken at night, this side effect can be minimized. These three antihistamines are safe to take on a daily basis. Over-the-counter decongestants such as pseudoephedrine (found in Sudafed) and phenylephrine should be used very carefully, they can cause elevated blood pressure, heart palpitations, difficulty falling asleep, and irritability. They're not recommended for patients who have heart conditions, high blood pressure, or hyperthyroidism.

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Q
Can you develop seasonal allergies as an adult?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Yes, adults can develop environmental allergies at any age. Asthma can develop during adulthood as well. A runny nose isn’t always a sign of allergies, though. Older individuals may experience a runny nose due to age-related physical changes — some people, as they age, develop overactive tear ducts and nasal secretions (it’s called cholinergic hyperactivity). […] Read More

Yes, adults can develop environmental allergies at any age. Asthma can develop during adulthood as well. A runny nose isn’t always a sign of allergies, though. Older individuals may experience a runny nose due to age-related physical changes -- some people, as they age, develop overactive tear ducts and nasal secretions (it's called cholinergic hyperactivity). Also, some medications taken for other conditions such as high blood pressure, prostate enlargement, or erectile dysfunction can cause a runny nose as a side effect.

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Q
How is clothes allergy treated?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
If you know what clothing causes your rash, and you stop wearing it, the rash usually goes away by itself, and you don’t need medications. But if the condition is serious, the doctor may treat you with antihistamines, moisture creams, or steroids to give you some relief while your rash goes away. Try an oatmeal […] Read More

If you know what clothing causes your rash, and you stop wearing it, the rash usually goes away by itself, and you don’t need medications.

But if the condition is serious, the doctor may treat you with antihistamines, moisture creams, or steroids to give you some relief while your rash goes away. Try an oatmeal bath to soothe your skin. More severe cases of dermatitis may be treated with oral steroids like prednisone and wet dressings.

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Q
How can I prevent clothes allergy?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
The first thing is to stop wearing the item that bothers you. Your skin will most likely clear up within a few weeks. You can also: Wear natural fibers and loose clothes to help cut how much you sweat. Choose light-colored garments with less dye in them. Avoid items labeled “wash separately.” They’re more likely […] Read More

The first thing is to stop wearing the item that bothers you. Your skin will most likely clear up within a few weeks. You can also:

  • Wear natural fibers and loose clothes to help cut how much you sweat.
  • Choose light-colored garments with less dye in them.
  • Avoid items labeled “wash separately.” They’re more likely to bleed dye.
  • Don’t wear clothes that say wash and wear, permanent press, no-iron, or dirt repellent. They’re likely to have chemicals that irritate your skin.
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Q
Who is allergic to clothes?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Women are more likely to have it because they more often wear tight-fitting clothes. So are obese people when they overheat and sweat. People with atopic dermatitis, a skin disease that affects mostly children, are also more likely to get textile dermatitis. Where you work also matters. People with jobs in hot and humid places, […] Read More

Women are more likely to have it because they more often wear tight-fitting clothes. So are obese people when they overheat and sweat. People with atopic dermatitis, a skin disease that affects mostly children, are also more likely to get textile dermatitis.

Where you work also matters. People with jobs in hot and humid places, like a bakery, have greater odds of dermatitis. If you wear latex gloves on the job, your hands may get irritated (which would be irritant dermatitis) or you may become allergic to the latex itself. That’s allergic contact dermatitis.

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Q
What are the symptoms?
A
AGE2B consultant
0
Look for redness, scaly skin, or itchy areas. Sometimes they pop up within hours after you put on your clothes, or they may take days or weeks to appear. Some people can wear the same item for years before a rash breaks out. Symptoms often begin in the folds of your skin or other areas […] Read More

Look for redness, scaly skin, or itchy areas. Sometimes they pop up within hours after you put on your clothes, or they may take days or weeks to appear. Some people can wear the same item for years before a rash breaks out.

Symptoms often begin in the folds of your skin or other areas that make contact with your clothes and what’s in them. That includes:

  • The crooks of your arms;
  • Behind your knees;
  • Armpits;
  • The groin;
  • Any place where your clothing is tight.
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